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Wave Height Watch for Indian Ocean Region

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  • Wave Height Watch for Indian Ocean Region

    Been using this site to keep track of wave heights over the Indian Ocean Basin. Not sure if it's useful to you or not. I know the area I've been keeping tabs on is rarely over 1.5 metre wave height
    http://www.surfline.com/surfdata/cha...iowave&id=2950

  • #2
    How long have you been keeping tabs on this area?
    Handy site, mind you...

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    • #3
      Thank you. The Andeman Sea is like a very big bay. Very low waves. Average here is .5 meters. High for the year could reach 2 meters and the 100 year mega wave reaches 5 meters.

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      • #4
        Would be interesting to know how, climate change will affect wave height in the future

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        • #5
          Years and years ago in was on a large commercial ship (1000 container or so ) and i can tell you i have seen and experienced monster waves in the Indian Ocean. The front of the ship (prow) was not visible for a few seconds. Large ships are much worse as something small, on top of the wave, the crest the long vessel tips the heads straight down, something small just "rides" it.

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          • #6
            SphyrnaTek, I've been keeping tabs on a region within bounds on the 90 East ridge for almost 4 years now. Low to no risk of cyclonic storms, lazy Coriolis free waves, and just within range depth wise of a fairly simple dead weight caternary morning system. The fact that it's in a relatively quiet zone shipping wise, and international waters keeps me keen on watching it.

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            • #7
              As for climate change, the Indian Ocean dipole is a unique phenomenon that I need to learn more about. It could contribute to marine Aquaculture die offs if not accounted for seasonally, as well as adjusting localized salinity due to excessive rain fall in areas. Climate change will not help any, if the historic to present data is as accurate as I believe it to be.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by AndrewKKozak View Post
                SphyrnaTek, I've been keeping tabs on a region within bounds on the 90 East ridge for almost 4 years now. Low to no risk of cyclonic storms, lazy Coriolis free waves, and just within range depth wise of a fairly simple dead weight caternary morning system. The fact that it's in a relatively quiet zone shipping wise, and international waters keeps me keen on watching it.
                Cool, so it's just the freak stuff you've got to worry about.

                Climate change, looking at historical data, never does help

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                • #9
                  Rogue waves concern me, but again, running through over 10 years of satellite wave height data for the region, and the 4 years of buoy and other source data, seems placid enough that I'd be more than happy to risk it.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by AndrewKKozak View Post
                    Rogue waves concern me, but again, running through over 10 years of satellite wave height data for the region, and the 4 years of buoy and other source data, seems placid enough that I'd be more than happy to risk it.
                    Yeah I think that should do it....

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                    • #11
                      I'd rather live knowing a wave might get me, than living in fear of getting shot, a dumbass driver killing me, or the government incarcerating me over some rich politicians policy.

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                      • Marc de Piolenc
                        Marc de Piolenc commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Especially since a spar buoy habitat can be protected even from a monster by analyzing the upper part of the structure the way the deck hatch of a commercial cargo vessel is analyzed. The big problem with a rogue wave is that they are not, by definition, predictable, so the structure has to be ready at all times. In fairly shallow water, you have to assume the wave is breaking...right over your platform.

                    • #12
                      Originally posted by AndrewKKozak View Post
                      I'd rather live knowing a wave might get me, than living in fear of getting shot, a dumbass driver killing me, or the government incarcerating me over some rich politicians policy.
                      It's not paranoia, if they really are out to get you

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                      • #13
                        Originally posted by AndrewKKozak View Post
                        I'd rather live knowing a wave might get me, than living in fear of getting shot, a dumbass driver killing me, or the government incarcerating me over some rich politicians policy.
                        It would have to be some freak accident for a wave to get you. A greater concern is seasickness in heavy seas. The spar design would not rock and roll so much as a vessel but still i would get sick.

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                        • Marc de Piolenc
                          Marc de Piolenc commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Seasickness is a matter of frequency, and it is possible to tune a spar buoy to avoid that range of frequencies. Another problem is multi-axis acceleration, and that is no problem at all - spars heave, but have practically no roll or pitch. Yaw is more a matter of anchoring forces, so it's not directly related to the design of the platform.

                      • #14
                        Originally posted by Manfred View Post

                        It would have to be some freak accident for a wave to get you. A greater concern is seasickness in heavy seas. The spar design would not rock and roll so much as a vessel but still i would get sick.
                        That's why Stemitil is my best friend

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