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  • Marine Aquaculture

    Just set up a placeholder topic for Marine Aquaculture. For individuals, I don't know if it would apply per-se, but I'm envisioning a seastead cooperative, and so that kind of venture needs an income source. My initial project would be production of seaweeds and eelgrass for benthic and epiphytic grazers (sea sheep, as it were). Caged shellfish is also on the planning table, though I am not quite brushed up on that topic at the moment.

  • #2
    Sounds good. My idea is to get kelp within California state waters, with a license.
    Dry kelp and make pellets of it for animal feed, and sell it.
    And anything else for revenue generating activity.

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    • #3
      Would you be talking about Macrocystis Pyrifera? I bet it would gasify well to get producers gas to help run a colonies extraneous power needs, given its amazing growth rate. I am currently reviewing articles involving Gracilaria Asiatica, due to its tropical heat tolerance, and it's Agarose production capacity. Agar-Agar has had some shortages in recent years, that has messed with the price enough. I believe that it would work fairly well with a modified long line culture.

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      • skipperzzyzx
        skipperzzyzx commented
        Editing a comment
        Yes Macrocystis pyrifera - giant kelp
        and Nereocystis luetkeana - bull kelp
        In Southern-California waters, ultimately to grow it as kelp fields on the highs seas. Going 3 miles, 12 miles, and 200 miles from shore.
        And to grow whatever else. example: other sea weed species, mussels, abalone, tuna fish ranching, etc...
        And to consider all other possibilities to grow crops on surface or in Nemos Garden kind of setting.
        I am trying to focus on the easiest entry point.

        There is also the ring weave technology to create structures and mooring line from used car tires. And take the recycling fee for car tires.
        (There has been a long term study conducted on tires immersed in sea water.
        CALIFORNIA INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT BOARD:
        EFFECTS OF WASTE TIRES,WASTE TIRE FACILITIES, AND WASTE TIRE PROJECTS ON THE ENVIRONMENT
        Publication # 432-96-029, May 1996 https://www2.calrecycle.ca.gov/Publi...s/Download/110 )

    • #4
      My gf wants to grow this seaweed for food when we get out there.

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    • #5
      Not everyones taste works with sea based food, we can't forget the "normal" stuff that grown on land.
      If all that's on menu is "seafood", getting people to move to Seasteading will be a very difficult undertaking...

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      • #6
        Sea grapes elwar?

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        • #7
          Anyone seen this
          The first ever underwater cultivation of terrestrial plants.

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          • CatonTodd
            CatonTodd commented
            Editing a comment
            Thanks for sharing this link to Nemo’s Garden, this is really interesting. It makes you wonder if it might be possible to have industrial sized acrylic domes installed under the sea for just such a purpose, but for growing much larger agricultural products and being able to walk around. Might be a great way to keep pollinators (if it got that far....underwater bee colonies? Lol) within the confines of the crop area without losing them to hungry fish, strong winds, and such. The dome concept itself could be a really great way to create community spaces under the sea as well.

            Any serious thoughts as to the implications of such a technique to grow food and create communal spaces?

        • #8
          Originally posted by AndrewKKozak View Post
          Sea grapes elwar?
          Or Green Caviar
          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caulerpa_lentillifera

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          • #9
            Not sure about the stuff myself. She eats it at restaurants and will try to grow them at the seastead. Apparently they are fairly expensive.

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            • #10
              elwar , high value crops with lower inputs isn't a bad thing for a seastead!

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              • #11
                Interesting concept. Would not mind trying it out.
                https://qz.com/quartzy/1501623/shrim...he-real-thing/

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