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  • Seastead commuter vehicles

    So let's discuss something I am dealing with right now. How to commute from the seastead to land.

    Getting there and back is easy. But what boat would be best for this? You have waves on the way that are a bit rough for a dinghy or jet ski so no calm water vessels. You also have to park your boat in open, sometimes rough, seas.

    My current solution is a 12 meter steel hulled sailboat. But we have not parked it out there yet and I am worried about how it behaves sitting in really bad weather.

    I think initially we will take it to the nearby island for safe anchoring if we see the wearher getting bad.

    What do you think would be ideal? For a small setup like ours up to the big city seasteads?

    I am leaning toward personal subs myself...but that is just a dream solution right now. Helicopters?

  • #2
    Speed, save and low maintenance https://www.wetamarine.com/
    Not everyone's first choice as the dingy is a bit small but end of the day people crossed the pacific in rowing boats and Alain Bombard sailed across the Atlantic in an inflatable boat of 4.5 meters.
    Sure not every day would be suitable to commute with a weta but traveling time is important, so "parking".

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Manfred View Post
      Speed, save and low maintenance https://www.wetamarine.com/
      Not everyone's first choice as the dingy is a bit small but end of the day people crossed the pacific in rowing boats and Alain Bombard sailed across the Atlantic in an inflatable boat of 4.5 meters.
      Sure not every day would be suitable to commute with a weta but traveling time is important, so "parking".
      Ya. I considered a whaly boat for durability but I've been in a dinghy in those waves and it's like being in a rodeo. I almost bought a smaller sail boat but after going out in my friend's 14m boat having waves come up to the side I went bigger.

      Though yesterday the water was so flat I could have been to the island in 15 minutes on a jet ski.

      Comment


      • #4
        Hey Chad.

        How do you handle commute/supply docking to LXII right now? Can you safe and secure dock and tie up your sailboat to LXII hull? Or, do you have to drop anchor close buy and dinghy up to LXII?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by elwar View Post

          Ya. I considered a whaly boat for durability but I've been in a dinghy in those waves and it's like being in a rodeo. I almost bought a smaller sail boat but after going out in my friend's 14m boat having waves come up to the side I went bigger.

          Though yesterday the water was so flat I could have been to the island in 15 minutes on a jet ski.
          The 400 or 500 range of Whaly boats http://www.whalyboats.co.uk/9-modelsspecvideorrp.html arguably are not dingys.
          The first question arising motorized, sail or combo. Depending on the local circumstances with ease of refueling ,,,,,,,,
          Jet ski is simply not an option, no storage space and no emergency oars.

          Comment


          • #6
            I came across this dilemma. I have an idea, so others can disagree with it. It's OK with me.
            I would use a large boat and fill most of it with a water resistant foam, so even if it boat gets full of water, it would not sink.
            I would leave space for limited number of passengers and limited amount of cargo.
            There is enough space on the sea for the large boat.
            I would use a combination of electric motor, and a generator, and batteries, and may be solar panels.
            Mast and sails might be good too.
            I would tow a dinghy, go close to shore, anchor the boat and use the dinghy to shore.
            This would be my commute to shore, not for ocean crossing. I would moor the boat at a buoy close to XLII and keep it there.
            I would leave no valuables in the boat or in the dinghy.
            I thought about building such a boat, but my space is limited. Though I might still build one, as an experiment.
            I would have to use a trailer to get it to the water. If it could stay in the water, the better. Nothing beats free.

            This seems to be a common dilemma, see Adventure Builder: Jaimie.

            You might have to experiment and find solution through practical experience as a pioneer of seasteading.

            Sincerely, and congratulations!

            Comment


            • Marc de Piolenc
              Marc de Piolenc commented
              Editing a comment
              The problem is that a typical large sailboat has extensive ballast in the keel, which then has to be offset with foam that may take up the entire hull. It's best to get a shallow-draft boat that is specifically designed for low "slamming" in heavy seas. It has to have an entirely enclosed cabin to prevent swamping, either en route or while anchored. That kind of boat can have enough reserve buoyance to prevent it from sinking completely if capsized or swamped, while leaving enough volume for the crew, passengers and stores.
              Then you can tackle the real problem: anchoring it so it is available to step aboard, but will not strike the platform under choppy conditions. Not an area I know much about, but there are extensive texts on anchoring. You or an engineering friend may have to spend some time perusing them.

            • skipperzzyzx
              skipperzzyzx commented
              Editing a comment
              I do not want to persuade anyone of anything. My engineering friends are busy making a living. Me too.
              You can do it whatever way you want to. Please let us know how it works for you.

          • #7
            My vote would be for a multihull or tunnel-hull motorboat, simply because twelve miles is going to start looking like a very long distance when you forget something on your last grocer run. A motorboat can get you there fast, a good hull design will not force you to slow to walking speed in bad weather, and if seaworthy will get you where you need to go in the end. I just finished reading The Nature of Boats, by Dave Gerr. Highly recommended.

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            • #8
              Well it is not a helicopter it floats at sea and will get you 20 miles out in minuets https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kwC8MP6uOiQ it is a wing and ground effect hovercraft you could have 5 foot waves at sea and zip on home or out for groceries and not care.

              Comment


              • #9
                ^ looks great but what happened, the video is 10 years old, did it fail to take off?

                Other issues with motorized craft, as soon as you enter territorial water you probable have to register. Also the engine or the whole boot "disappear" faster.

                Comment


                • #10
                  Originally posted by Barskor View Post
                  Well it is not a helicopter it floats at sea and will get you 20 miles out in minuets https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kwC8MP6uOiQ it is a wing and ground effect hovercraft you could have 5 foot waves at sea and zip on home or out for groceries and not care.
                  Looks good. Still not sure about the parking in the ocean part. And Thailand has a thing against planes that can land in water. They're outlawed so the main use of going into town would be moot.

                  Comment


                  • Barskor
                    Barskor commented
                    Editing a comment
                    This type of craft is usually classified as a boat surprising as that is as the operational ceiling is about 3 meters off the surface you can make short hops higher than that though.

                • #11
                  Originally posted by Tavi View Post
                  Hey Chad.

                  How do you handle commute/supply docking to LXII right now? Can you safe and secure dock and tie up your sailboat to LXII hull? Or, do you have to drop anchor close buy and dinghy up to LXII?
                  The current approach is that my friend who has a sailboat takes us out. He has a dinghy that we drive over to the ladder and climb up from there. We have 2 mooring balls attached to the two anchors (third anchor going in next week).

                  The hope is that my sailboat can handle the rough waves and we can just park our boat there and dinghy back and forth. Might be better to get a kayak for attaching it to the ladder as the waves pick up.

                  We will be exploring other options but if the sailboat doesn't do well parked in waves we can just watch the forecast and if they're predicting anything over 18 knot winds we can just enjoy a sail to one of the islands and park in the bay while it blows over.

                  Our ultimate goal is to build a marina. But that's another topic entirely.

                  Comment


                  • Tavi
                    Tavi commented
                    Editing a comment
                    I see. I would say that in your case a heavier floating dock (concrete would be best) @ both ends of transit would help A LOT in ruff seas.

                    I wouldn't recommend a sailboat for commuter/supply boat. Too slow and overall unsuitable design for the job at hand. A 35-40 feet trawler with a diesel would be my first choice. A marina it's a good idea,... But, 12 nm offshore blowing @ 18 knt with no shelter, it must be a floating one. It can be done. And probably very cheap in Thailand.
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