Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

XLII Specs

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Would it be impertinent to ask; how much was the build cost?

    Comment


    • #17
      They say it cost about the same as a average home so there is a ball park number.

      Comment


      • #18
        Yes, that's incredibly vague considering the variability of home costs globally.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by Diasporgaia View Post
          Would it be impertinent to ask; how much was the build cost?
          I go into the price of the seastead here:

          https://ocean.builders/how-much-do-o...easteads-cost/

          Comment


          • skipperzzyzx
            skipperzzyzx commented
            Editing a comment
            Great progress. I am happy to see your success.

        • #20
          What type of steel did y'all use for the spar?

          What is the expected lifespan of the spar (not the platform)?

          Comment


          • #21
            Originally posted by Diasporgaia View Post
            What type of steel did y'all use for the spar?

            What is the expected lifespan of the spar (not the platform)?
            We used normal steel. The spar should last as long or longer than a steel hulled ship depending on if it is maintained. By maintain I mean the anodes are kept up and the interior is kept clean (free of salt).

            Comment


            • #22
              How was the spar moved to the site? I watched the video so I have the answer to this.

              Does the spar have internal chambers or above the cement plug and sand is it just a single internal space?
              Last edited by Diasporgaia; 03-05-2019, 06:22 PM.

              Comment


              • #23
                Brilliant! What bothered me when I was doing my calculations in 1989 to 1995 was: how do you tow something that is already ballasted for vertical floating out to its site? Pour concrete while out at sea? Eeeeeh. Never occurred to me to ballast it for transit with sand...

                Comment


                • #24
                  Running calculations to see how closely my back-of-the envelope math model agrees with reality. One bit of data that I don't have is the sand. How much of it, how much remains in the spar, how much water with it?

                  Comment


                  • #25
                    Originally posted by Marc de Piolenc View Post
                    Brilliant! What bothered me when I was doing my calculations in 1989 to 1995 was: how do you tow something that is already ballasted for vertical floating out to its site? Pour concrete while out at sea? Eeeeeh. Never occurred to me to ballast it for transit with sand...
                    Large container ships just use seawater to ballast. Depending which part of the ship has heavier or has empty containers seawater is pumped in or out to have equal weight true-out.
                    With a ferrocement spar having salt water on the inside is not an issue. Dividing chambers are needed to reduce splashing about and in bad weather some is pumped out to raise the spar out of the water.
                    Calm sea water is pumped in to get as close to the water as possible.

                    Comment


                    • #26
                      Documentation on the Armstrong "seadromes," various criticisms of them [N-B] The Armstrong Seadrome - ancestor of today's modular floa.txt US1511153A.pdf BA157.pdf Popular Science search results Armstrong Seadrome.pdf are posted here.
                      Last edited by Marc de Piolenc; 03-04-2019, 10:22 AM.

                      Comment


                      • #27
                        The Navy's VLFS project exceeds the size limits of the Web site. All my files on floating structures (other than ships) are here:
                        https://www.dropbox.com/sh/aak9vd7oj...D37cdPq1a?dl=0
                        Last edited by Marc de Piolenc; 03-04-2019, 10:14 AM.

                        Comment


                        • #28
                          Originally posted by elwar View Post

                          We used normal steel. The spar should last as long or longer than a steel hulled ship depending on if it is maintained. By maintain I mean the anodes are kept up and the interior is kept clean (free of salt).
                          When you said you flooded the spar with water to orient it upright, I assume you mean seawater (as opposed to hauling 30 tons of fresh water out to sea).

                          Now that you've gotten into position, have you been able to replace that mass with something non-corrosive? How are you doing it gradually? (since I'm assuming you can't just pump it all out or your house will tip over) Lowering dense, water-tight packages into place? More sand vacuumed up from the seafloor? (I bet that's far harder than it sounds). Running your desalinator flat-out and gradually reducing the salinity of the water in the spar? Do you use a ladder or climbing gear to get down in there?

                          I'm thoroughly impressed with what you guys are doing. Good luck.

                          Comment


                          • #29
                            https://www.paper-dragon.com/fistsan...-airport-1934/
                            Originally posted by Marc de Piolenc View Post
                            Documentation on the Armstrong "seadromes," various criticisms of them [ATTACH]n392[/ATTACH] [ATTACH]n393[/ATTACH] [ATTACH]n394[/ATTACH] [ATTACH]n395[/ATTACH] are posted here.
                            Floating Ocean Airport, 1934
                            https://www.paper-dragon.com/fistsan...-airport-1934/

                            or
                            http://blog.modernmechanix.com/uncle...cean-airports/
                            Last edited by Manfred; 03-14-2019, 07:14 AM.

                            Comment


                            • #30
                              How are you finding the stability so far from a comfort standpoint? What's the farthest you've tried raising the house above sealevel, and does it noticeably sway more at that height? When you say, "It's designed to handle 5m waves," does that assume you'll pump out enough ballast to lift the house 2.5 m above sealevel?

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X