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XLII Specs

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  • XLII Specs

    The spar is a 20 meter steel cylinder, 2 meter diameter and 14mm thick. There is a smaller cylinder attached to the top that is 2 meters long and 1 meter diameter.

    We filled the bottom of the cylinder with 3 cubic meters of concrete. When the spar was horizontal we poured 10 tons of sand in and spread it out evenly to balance out the spar.

    There are 2 pumps and an electronic valve for letting water in and pumping water out.

    When we were at sea we pumped water into the valve so it would flow with the sand toward the bottom with the concrete. After some time the spar flipped vertical.

    We have 4 struts attached to the top of the spar which will be used for supporting the platform.

    The center cylinder helps support the platform and allows access to the interior of the cylinder.


    The platform is a 6 meter diameter octagon shape which comes to about 26 sqm each floor (52 sqm total). The bottom floor has a kitchen, dining area, storage room, office desk and a bedroom. The floor is about 10cm deep providing storage space for battery packs, piping/electric, water maker and water storage tanks.

    The upper floor is a wide open deck with a stainless steel rail and frame above for holding up the solar panels.

    The whole platform is made to float, only sitting about 10 cm deep. It has proven itself in some fairly rough waves on transport having no problem with waves coming up 1 meter on the side.

  • #2
    That's pretty cool. How deep is the water around your location? Are you anchored to anything?

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    • #3
      Floor depth is that the space between the deck beams, or the distance between the two outer surfaces?
      Do you have any photos or CAD models of the platform?

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      • #4
        The depth is 60 meters. We are currently anchored with 3 400 kg anchors attached to very thick chains (about 20 meters long) attached to very thick rope. The ropes are attached at the center of the cylinder.

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        • #5
          The interior bottom floor is just over 2 meters high. It is much like walking inside a catamaran living space. No ducking down necessary.

          The bottom of the platform is flat with a steel I beam frame surrounding it. Then we go up about 30 cm for the floor. Tall enough for the large batteries and room for cables on top.

          I do have some CAD pics but on a hard drive packed away until we move in.

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          • #6
            Are you intending on "actually" moving into the platform? or inhabiting a later model after this one has been tested thoroughly...

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            • #7
              Oh may I ask what CAD software you are using?

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              • #8
                as currently designed can two or more be directly linked together? i would want one one to live in, one to store (a lot of) supplies and equipment and a small machine shop, plus of course the redundancy factor. sorry if thats in the specs, im new to this.

                i assume at the least 2 sets of spars.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by SphyrnaTek View Post
                  Are you intending on "actually" moving into the platform? or inhabiting a later model after this one has been tested thoroughly...
                  Everything I own is currently sitting on a boat ready to move on once the platform is moved onto the spar. I will be living on it as soon as possible.

                  The CAD software being used is Sketchup. The building company has all of the actual models. I just have pictures of the models.

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                  • skipperzzyzx
                    skipperzzyzx commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Congratulations. You are number one.

                • #10
                  Originally posted by vapourminer View Post
                  as currently designed can two or more be directly linked together? i would want one one to live in, one to store (a lot of) supplies and equipment and a small machine shop, plus of course the redundancy factor. sorry if thats in the specs, im new to this.

                  i assume at the least 2 sets of spars.
                  We want to see the stability first. The hope is that they are stable enough to connect via bridges much like how a boat connects via a walkway at a marina. Something that can be pulled up during storms.

                  I agree that most people will want a work space. I think we will eventually build empty platform floors. But the cost will likely not be much less than a full platform since most of the cost is from the floor down.

                  The open deck can be used for light weight projects and gives some good blank space.

                  There is also a lot of storage space inside the spar.

                  Comment


                  • Marc de Piolenc
                    Marc de Piolenc commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Flexibly connecting two structures that need to be free to heave independently will be a hell of a challenge. The US Navy, which studied this problem in connection with pre-positioning supplies off a coastline, came up with a variation of the Armstrong "seadrome" platform, originally designed to be anchored landing fields for aircraft, in the days when most did not have trans-oceanic range. Basically, it is a set of columns (spars) topped by a platform and with a kind of a "shoe" below. The columns are rigidly linked. Naturally, there needs to be more than two - I would suspect that four would be a minimal number. This work was referred to as "Very Large Floating Structures" if anybody wants to look it up. I have some documentation which I will post if I can figure out why.
                    Last edited by Marc de Piolenc; 03-04-2019, 09:38 AM.

                • #11
                  Originally posted by elwar View Post

                  Everything I own is currently sitting on a boat ready to move on once the platform is moved onto the spar. I will be living on it as soon as possible.

                  The CAD software being used is Sketchup. The building company has all of the actual models. I just have pictures of the models.
                  Well hopefully it'll all work out fine, and you'll not have too many problems...

                  May I suggest you have serious look at Autodesk Fusion 360, cloud based like Sketchup, but it's a fully fledged CAD program, and at this time FREE for startup ventures.

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                  • #12
                    Originally posted by elwar View Post

                    We want to see the stability first. The hope is that they are stable enough to connect via bridges much like how a boat connects via a walkway at a marina. Something that can be pulled up during storms.

                    I agree that most people will want a work space. I think we will eventually build empty platform floors. But the cost will likely not be much less than a full platform since most of the cost is from the floor down.

                    The open deck can be used for light weight projects and gives some good blank space.

                    There is also a lot of storage space inside the spar.
                    This is going to take time, not something to rush...

                    Maybe the next step, could be three spars interconnected as you say, by "bridges" and just left to float and see what happens...

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                    • #13
                      Very rough estimates, based on data available, but I'd say your spar by itself is displacing nearly 65 cubic metres of seawater. Does that sound about right. And my guess is that your spar, sans housing, is roughly 12,000kg +/- a bit?

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                      • #14
                        I haven't taken that top cylinder, or the mass of the 3m^3 concrete and 10 ton sand in the equation for net buoyancy at this point in time.

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                        • #15
                          Originally posted by AndrewKKozak View Post
                          Very rough estimates, based on data available, but I'd say your spar by itself is displacing nearly 65 cubic metres of seawater. Does that sound about right. And my guess is that your spar, sans housing, is roughly 12,000kg +/- a bit?
                          I think the weight I was looking at for just the spar was around 14 tonnes.

                          At full submersion it is just over 65 cubic meters is about right. But we would likely always have the top meter or two above water.

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