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  • #31
    OTEC, the temperature gravity wheel can be modified to OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion).
    Ten years ago, I was a bit bored and built one. It would need to be modified. I have some ideas for it.
    Here is a video of the one I built: https://youtu.be/gdmU6EEAnXI

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    • #32
      ^^^ Thanks, so many possibility just a matter of finding and implementing the right one.

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      • #33
        "Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters" is available at this URL https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1055480

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        • #34
          OTEC is awesome, but really best suited to deep equatorial waters where there's a big enough temperature difference to give decent thermodynamic efficiencies. If you have a seastead in shallow water like the Gulf of Thailand where it's only 50-75m deep and there's only a few degrees temperature difference, I suspect the efficiency would be too low to justify the cost.

          Boosting with solar thermal collectors is interesting (I hadn't heard of it before); I'd be curious to see how it compares cost-wise with solar + batteries, though.

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          • #35
            How realistic would it be to invest in thermoelectric generators? Finding a way to harvest the heat produced by evacuated solar tubes and converting to electricity?

            I read how the GoSun solar cooker (great product too for energy free cooking in hours of daylight...something I’d be interested in investing in for clean energy to do all or most of my cooking in a seasteading home, or anywhere for that matter)), I read that the solartubes in the GoSun can get up to 550°F or more. Plus, they are made out of borosilicate glass so not as fragile as many might think. Besides something slamming into them during a storm, the only real danger is thermal shock, which is actually harder to do. They are round/tubular so they are more aerodynamic than a flat solar panel, and even do their jobs on cloudy days. They don’t rust or oxidize like a metal. They don’t take up a lot of room and aren’t nearly as expensive to replace as a solar panel (which is more likely to flap around in high winds during a storm and detach). The excess thermoelectric energy produced during the days could be put to use charging/topping off battery systems. If done properly, the thermoelectric generator could even be placed somewhere around a hot water line being heated by the solar tubes. Or fixed somehow to a solar tube cooking station to convert heat into additional energy. One product I’ve seen that does something similar, albeit with wood as a fuel source to create heat, is the Biolite stove. I actually prefer the cleaner option of solar heat rather than carbon based heating, but it’s promising to see heat charging a battery pack.

            Would this be realistic?

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            • skipperzzyzx
              skipperzzyzx commented
              Editing a comment
              The basic concept appears to me realistic. I do not know much about the details, efficiencies and logistics.

          • #36
            https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=7ZN5CthZhvg


            As a wave generator, this actually seems promising, and could be done on a much smaller and more affordable scale. I’ve seen the tubular pipe wave energy harvesters that require anchors to keep in place, and lots of square (ocean) footage to employ. Personally, those look less aesthetic, which initially won’t be as important during the experimental phase of seasteading, but many people will always be aesthetically motivated. Plus, these are easier to navigate around than long expanses of floating tubes, easier to get to than submerged turbines, and a much smaller footprint/barely noticeable in comparison. Im
            sure they’d have to be much easier to maintain as well than lengthy systems of pipes where all the mechanism of the harvester would be inside the massive long tubes. I can’t even imagine how difficult it could be to fix just a section of a floating tube without exposing the rest of the system to submersion.

            Thoughts on the kind of wave energy generator (as opposed to other versions) which are demonstrated in the video?
            Last edited by CatonTodd; 04-10-2019, 09:11 AM.

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            • skipperzzyzx
              skipperzzyzx commented
              Editing a comment
              The video is nice. A piston engine crankshaft comes to my mind. The one in the video seems like a good idea.

              Sometimes I wonder how a half submerged horizontal cylinder with a spiral on the outside would react to waves.
              Would such a cylinder start turning when anchored and pulled against the waves? Could a cylinder be connected
              to a generator to make electricity?

              Have to make it to find out.
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