Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Ring Weave Technology

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    more details 5 pictures per post

    Comment


    • #17
      5 more

      Comment


      • #18
        five more pictures:

        Comment


        • #19
          last two pictures of this I have

          Comment


          • #20
            You use Pneumatic Scissor Shears to cut sides off or Jig saw?

            Comment


            • #21
              The sides walls of a regular car tire have no steel mash. I use a box cutting knife. I make a cut, I bend the rubber to open the cut,
              and I cut again. It works well.

              To cut the belts I use jig saw or reciprocating saw. The belts have steel mash in them.
              Difficult to cut the rubber with steel mesh in it because whatever cuts the rubber, does not cut the steel.
              What ever cuts the steel frictions with the rubber.

              Semi truck tires have steel mesh inside the side walls too. I use a jig saw or reciprocating saw for that.

              I am planning to get some specialized tire cutting equipment such as: https://youtu.be/44gOqWQIc8k

              Comment


              • #22
                The Art:

                Comment


                • #23
                  Did have a little snoop around to see what is used to cut tires:
                  Does come a few times close to cut electric cord
                  home made model

                  did't know is that easy
                  also and

                  Japanese just simply rip out the steel with brute force


                  Water jet cutting


                  Lots of ways to deal with it


                  Comment


                  • skipperzzyzx
                    skipperzzyzx commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Thank you for the posts.

                • #24
                  There was some technical mishap the first one is meant to be this one.

                  Comment


                  • #25
                    The way it works; is the length of the ring has to be four times of the with of the ring.
                    The size of the tires has to be the same to just cut the sidewall off and weave them.
                    A bigger tire makes a wider belt, and that does not fit into the woven structure.
                    The only way to fit it in is to cut the tire narrow, and that requires cutting the rubber
                    with the steel mash in it.

                    Comment


                    • #26
                      https://www2.calrecycle.ca.gov/Publi...s/Download/110
                      .
                      .

                      EFFECTS OF WASTE TIRES, WASTE TIRE FACILITIES, AND WASTE TIRE PROJECTS ON THE ENVIRONMENT

                      CALIFORNIA INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT BOARD
                      (California, USA)
                      .
                      .

                      In order to prevent waste rubber and in particular discarded automobile tires from damaging the environment,
                      it is highly desirable to recycle this material.
                      .
                      .

                      Stockpiling whole tires creates two significant hazards: mosquitoes and fires.
                      .
                      .

                      A study of the leaching of tire rubber from waste piles was published in 1992 by the
                      U.S. Department of Commerce, National Technical Information Service.
                      .
                      .

                      The test results showed that the concentrations of hazardous constituents detected in the
                      samples did not exceed the concentration values necessary to be defined as hazardous waste.
                      .
                      .
                      There has been a long term study conducted on tires immersed in sea water.
                      The study concluded that after 42 years tires constructed of polyisoprene and immersed at a
                      depth of 80 feet showed very little degradation. Analytical tests on the tires identified
                      that the tire rubber absorbed enough water to equal 5% of its mass. Concentrations of
                      rubber, carbon black, sulfur, zinc oxide, mercaptobenzothiazole, and stearic acid were
                      within ±10% of those that would be found in the original tire composition.
                      .
                      .
                      https://www2.calrecycle.ca.gov/Publi...s/Download/110

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X